fbpx
Friday, March 1, 2024
Udaipur Standard Hindi

John Wick Chapter 4 Review: Keanu Reeves’ Biggest, Deadliest, Most Personal Action Orgy Ever

Must read


The air is thick with tragedy and pain in John Wick: Chapter 4. Perhaps even more so than in the last three films, the stakes here feel personal and the consequences real. I’m not sure Chapter 4 is the strongest of the spectacular four-film franchise to date. It’s definitely a worthy contender with Chapter 1. At almost three hours, it is also the longest ever. I’m pretty sure this movie captures the spirit of this film series just like its predecessors. Friendship and results. connection and its cost.

John Wick Chapter 4 Review: Keanu Reeves stars as the titular John Wick.
John Wick Chapter 4 Review: Keanu Reeves stars as the titular John Wick.

Picking up where things left off at the end of Chapter 3 for Jon (the incomparable, surprisingly intern Keanu Reeves), it’s now at war with the High Table. The end of the previous film saw John decide to go back on his deal with The Table with Winston. Only after he is shot by Winston and thrown off the roof of the New York Continental, just barely making it out alive. The choice of friendship almost cost him his life. This is a running theme in chapter four. Friendship and Results.

A View from John Wick: Chapter 4.

John is on a warpath. This time there is a deliberateness to his actions and kill count that we haven’t seen since the first film. He is no longer on the kill or be killed back foot as he was in Chapters 2 and 3. There’s even more of a cold, angry emptiness behind Keanu’s eyes here. As if the few bits of humanity he had left are diminishing. Baba Yaga is back. And he’s out for blood. But, as he asks repeatedly through the film as some of his friends and allies have given up, what is his endgame? Where does it all end?

The Table sends a new top-dog general to end the John Wick epidemic and he poses a threat to their order. In Chapter 3 we get The Adjudicator by Asia Kate Dillon. This time we get a figure known as The Marquis (with Bill Skarsgård making a strong case for being the next great Bond villain). John has become a virus against the brutally enforced system of The High Table. A product of his own making that threatens to end his reign. This immediately made me think of Agent Smith from The Matrix. (This is one of many parallels and allusions to The Matrix Trilogy, my favorite being the sight of John waiting for a train at an empty train station, echoing The Matrix Revolutions). But unlike Agent Smith, the transition that John represents here is his humanity.

It makes you wonder – just what is it that makes John Wick so special? Is it simply that he is the most talented killer in a world full of them? His ability to take a historic beating and still get up and walk? Or that he somehow manages to make his friends – ruthless killers in an unforgiving world – hesitate, and think twice before carrying out orders, thereby working against their own existence? Whether it’s Ian McShane’s Winston, Halle Berry’s Sophia Al-Azwar in Chapter 3 or Hiroyuki Sanada’s Shimazu (Osaka Continental’s manager) in this film. Even the late, great Lance Riddick’s The Concierge looks down on him affectionately. John inspires compassion in a world that demands a lack of it.

Here, in order to take John down once and for all, The Marquis enlists the services of one of John’s old friends – Kane, played by martial arts maestro Donnie Yen, who is probably after John. Makes the biggest character of the franchise. Kane is blind, but this does not limit his ability to kill. He hacks and slashes with gleaming finesse and a quick, quiet grace. This is one dude who will stab you and walk away before you know what happened. And Yen knows when to be irreverent and when to be human. Much like he did in Rogue One, he may have been hired for the movies because of his impressive physical prowess he was born with, but it’s the throbbing heart and endearing presence he awards to his characters. that make them shine.

Like him, Chapter Four introduces arguably the most memorable characters from the franchise. In addition to returning figures like The Bowery King (Laurence Fishburne having a blast here, bringing a much-needed dose of snappiness to this bleak, self-serious world), we get new scene-stealing killers like Killa. He’s the scene-devouring German nightclub owner, played with a playful glee by Scott Adkins, who joins the ranks of Colin Farrell’s Penguins on the list of actors married to prosthetics with a performance that’s as good as it gets. There’s also a mysterious-to-a-mistake new killer on the scene called The Tracker (a compelling Shamier Anderson). But it seems they have no purpose other than to keep themselves from us and no doubt future installments of this expanded universe (they’ve already created a spin-off show called The Continental) and a spin-off show called The Continental. off film. Ballerina starring Ana de Armas).

A View from John Wick: Chapter 4.

I’m not sure that John Wick: Chapter 4 earns its length. There is a certain fatigue, repetition that has set in from this point in the stakes and the story, with the previous two films feeling like they somewhat go in circles. For example, a scene where The Marquis tells John that, deep down, he doesn’t know what to do with Freedom from the Table because being an assassin is who he really is. This is the same exchange we found in chapter 3 between John and the Elder in the desert. There’s also something complicated about the rules of this otherwise electric world. When he begins to back himself into a corner, writers Shay Hatton and Michael Finch invent new rules for how John can earn his freedom back, to give him an excuse to go on a new killing spree. Besides, how do Jon and his fellow scoundrels manage to travel around the world so often? Are there any “killer airlines”? Does John watch in-flight movies? food for thought.

But, narrative nitpicking aside, what we ultimately come to these movies for is their incredible, killer kinetic energy. And, on that front, Chapter Four delivers the grandest action orgy ever, with some of the most creatively choreographed carnage ever. More than just the same old guns and knives, here we get some bombastic bow and arrow action, a nunchuck sequence for the ages and even some serious death from traffic. The last forty minutes in particular, set in Paris, is pure bravura bloodshed with two of the best hand-to-hand set pieces I’ve seen in recent memory. There’s a breathtaking top-angle one-take sequence through an apartment building and a final heart-stopping fight sequence on the steps of the Sacré-Cour basilica. It’s a testament to how great action works in these movies, which are steeped in their settings in museums, rooftops, and nightclubs. As if these sequences could never happen anywhere else. Every element remains in the service of action. Like Say’s less-do-more approach to dialogue that makes lines difficult (pun intended), or how cinematographer Dan Lostsen plays with shadow and light. Heck, even the bloody subtitles are drenched in swag.

With John Wick: Chapter Four, stuntman-turned-director Chad Stahelski cements the series’ legacy as one of the purest, most stylish action movies ever made. The John Wick movies prove time and time again that action is an art in the right hands. Every knife a painting.


Source link
- Advertisement -spot_img

More articles

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

- Advertisement -spot_img

Latest article

%d bloggers like this: